Helix 3.5 - Fredman Technique

James Freeman

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This is my method of recreating the Fredman micing technique with the new cab block in Helix 3.5.

Helix allows 0.02ms delay steps which is the smallest delay in 48kHz sampling rate (1/48000), speed of sound is 343 m/s at room temperature so each 0.02ms delay step translates to 6.86mm (0.27") distance in the real world.
A time delay resolution of 0.02ms combined with the tiny non-linear phase delay created by the High Cut is precise enough to simulate any real world micro delay created between two mics as you will see in the video.

For the Fredman technique I use 0.06ms delay and adjust the High Cut to precisely control the notch frequency, the phase between the mics and volume mix are the two important factors, mic angle is not that critical.

I don't think people fully realize yet how incredibly versatile the new cab block is.


 
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This is my method of recreating the Fredman micing technique with the new cab block in Helix 3.5.

Helix allows 0.02ms delay steps which is the smallest delay in 48kHz sampling rate (1/48000), speed of sound is 343 m/s at room temperature so each 0.02ms delay step translates to 6.86mm (0.27") distance in the real world.
A time delay resolution of 0.02ms combined with the tiny non-linear phase delay created by the High Cut is precise enough to simulate any real world micro delay created between two mics as you will see in the video.

For the Fredman technique I use 0.06ms delay and adjust the High Cut to precisely control the notch frequency, the phase between the mics and volume mix are the two important factors, mic angle is not that critical.

I don't think people fully realize yet how incredibly versatile the new cab block is.



Great demonstration James! Sounds legit. I learned something new here--didn't realize you could get such precisely-controlled notch filtering like this.
 
didn't realize you could get such precisely-controlled notch filtering like this.
Yep.
Most equalizers (real or plugins) create a phase shift (Bode Plot), when combined with the small delay it creates a notch filter.
So you have even more control than the real world Fredman technique.

edit:
Unless you also use an equalizer in the real world, then it's just as versatile.
 
Amazing idea and awesome way of unravelling that tone.

Pointless information that will have about 0.0000001% relevance to the real thing but fuck it.

I’m guessing L6 used the same 57 for their angled position? as we know they tend to vary in tolerances a lot so using 2 different 57’s probably thickens things in a different way to using the same mic.

The official Fredman clip is 55° rather than 45°. I wonder if this is pettiness on Wilkinson releasing a 45° clip on the back of his name? curious if that makes much difference…… Nordstrom makes out it’s important but IDK.

I’m also not sure whether L6 sampled the top or bottom speaker in each cab. It seems Fredman uses both although most of the ENGL photos i’ve seen are from the top speakers.

CDADB08D-2E04-47A6-AD01-25BBFF729EC6.jpeg83928B2D-B6C3-4171-ACAC-BC9CA36AD50F.jpeg74A4F42E-56DF-44A5-BC79-35A465DD91D6.jpeg
 
I can listen to what's being cut by phase flipping.
Pan the speakers hard Left and Right and place a Stereo Width block and tick the "R Polarity" then place any mono block after it.


phase flip.png



Here's a video by Euge Valovirta where you can listen to the phase flipped signal around 6:48 which sounds exactly like what's being notched in the Helix method (not demonstrated in my video).

 
This is fantastic James, thank you.

What is your signal chain going into Native? I ask because I duplicated your settings for the most part, but my patch ended up sounding much more ragged then yours, which has been my stumbling point forever with Native... The sound you have is so nice and smooth by comparison.
 
It's basically a way to use two mics to cancel out "fizz".

For me, I like a bit of fizz, so I don't typically use it.

I always found the Fredman mic technique to produce very hot tones, and spikey in the high frequencies. (Fizzy was going to be the first descriptor I used, but highlights the difficulty of musical descriptors lol) I used to use it a lot, but less so these days.
 
I always found the Fredman mic technique to produce very hot tones, and spikey in the high frequencies. (Fizzy was going to be the first descriptor I used, but highlights the difficulty of musical descriptors lol) I used to use it a lot, but less so these days.
I'm faaaaiirrrllyyyy sure I have it right. You end up with that scoop in the high frequencies that is meant to tame the fizziness. I could be describing it wrong I guess???
 
What is your signal chain going into Native?

EMG 81 -> Cable -> Focusrite Saffire Pro 24 with Instrument Input switch engaged.
As basic as it gets.

I always found the Fredman mic technique to produce very hot tones, and spikey in the high frequencies.
It's basically a way to use two mics to cancel out "fizz".
For me, I like a bit of fizz, so I don't typically use it.
Yeah, some fizz is important, it's very tempting to remove all fizz but then the guitar sounds hollow and airy at the same time, the trick is to not overdo it and remove only a few db of the fizz.
 
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Great technique mr Freeman !
In the beginning of the video, can we call that "eq matching" ?
Btw, how do you set your Span Plus to have the red line fixed (as reference)
and this exact type of graphic (in yellow) please ?
Thank you
 
can we call that "eq matching" ?
No, it's just freezing of the graph.

Btw, how do you set your Span Plus to have the red line fixed (as reference)
"Static" near Save PNG, then hit "Take" and choose any color you like.

and this exact type of graphic (in yellow) please ?
Color near the hold Hold button.

I suggest reading the manual and watching a tutorial on youtube, it's really simple.
 
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