Calling it quits?

itchyfingers

Roadie
Messages
478
Not me personally, not yet anyway.

I jam regularly with a group of guys that are in their late 60s and 70s, and while they can be more dramatic than a group of high school girls, they're all super talented and have decades of experience under their belts. At last night's jam, one of the guys was moping about how he's never going to be in a band again, that ageism exists in the bar band scene just as much as the corporate world, and he's thinking of hanging it all up as there's not much point anymore. :cry:

Got me thinking about my own musical journey. I've had down times where I wasn't playing much, but have been hitting it pretty hard for the last 20 years or so. I'm not naturally talented, and I'm still not a very good guitarist, but I put in a lot of work and I collect nice gear to make me sound good. My perspective is that I am putting in years of work right now so that if I do make it another 20 years (questionable genes for that), I'll be talented enough to play in an old man jazz group, doing gigs that end at 5:00pm, having a blast playing standards with some world class musicians. I think I'll ask my wife to bury me with my number 1, and I hope to be playing the guitar right up until I kick the ole bucket.

Just wondering if/when the TGF homies ever considered calling it quits, and what brought you back.
 
I'll always be playing music in some way, it's just a part of who I am and keeps me sane.

Probably won't be loud rock bands with big amps and late nights in bars forever, but I also sing and play bluegrass and could go back to that, at some point. I spent all last weekend playing the mandolin and thinking it's pretty damn sweet, so small and light and nothing else needed.
 
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life long hobby I'm passionate about that brings enjoyment. quitting all together would be way worse for me than playing empty rooms or just jamming informally with friends or just playing solo at home. not doing it for fame or money so when you realize that is not the end goal and you can just have fun and be creative is the best part imo.
 
Once I’m too old for gigging I’ll just reside in the studio, which I prefer more than live stuff anyway.

I just joined a band last night with some dudes who are all 10-25 years old than me, a funk/rock cover band that gets some really great gigs in South Florida and sound pretty great as a unit. It’s just for kicks for them, they practice once a week and gig maybe 2x a month at the most. Perfect for me because I hate being tied down to multiple band practices a week and needing to find personal time when weekends are filled with gigs. They made a drama-free, self-contained band and just want to live it out until they can’t anymore. Like I told the guitarist last night, “I’m totally down to ride on the coattails ya guys have created over the years” :rofl
 
I have had moments in time when I called it quits. Mainly because the band itself ended. I am fortunate to be in a situation with some grown adults who want to be there and a situation that actively books without much work and pays well. Any one of these things is helpful in keeping the fire alive let alone all three factors.

I still long for a original metal thing but I fear original days are behind me and that kind of makes me sad. I have a lot fun doing what we do though so I will take it as overall a good thing.
 
2018-nearly 2020 I sold everything I had and stopped playing entirely. Dark times, toxic relationship, etc. etc. Slowly got back into it with some inexpensive gear right before 2020, by the pandemic I was back in full swing of gear whoring, started looking for people to jam with that summer which after various lineup changes and personnel shuffling ultimately led to my current band that's been gigging 1-2x a month for a little over a year now

I'm certainly not ever going to hang it up again! That was a big mistake
 
Nothing is forever

And somethings are only for some people for a period of time.

For nearly 30 years, I put the guitar down. Had other stuff that required all my attention.

I’m happy I get to enjoy the passion again.

I’ll say that the recording thing that got started here is Ridonculous

👍❤️🙏
 
I don't foresee that happening. Unless I can't use my hands or arms. Then I'll use my toes or take up the kazoo.
Playing out live for pay is another story. It's been a minute since my last gigs and I'm currently ok with that. I'm not pursuing it like I once did but I know I'll get out there again.
 
Unfortunately for me my lifelong dream to play guitar only started ~ 4 years ago, i have been passionate about music especially guitar since a was very young. in my early youth i was not encouraged and often times discouraged to play musical instruments, even though my parents were very aware of my passion for music, then later life (school/work) got seriously in the way
But for me journey is just starting and ill likely be playing guitar till I cant no more
Its a passion that i enjoy very much and I'm not looking to play in a band or make a profession out of it, just play at home and record songs ive always loved and wanted to play

Cheers
Mike
 
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I struggle with this question all the time. I don't think there's any likelihood I'd ever walk away from the guitar altogether, but my relationship with music waxes and wanes pretty dramatically.

I was a late bloomer in a lot of ways - didn't start gigging on a regular basis until I was about 30, and I put the brakes on to focus on family shortly after. Now I take stock of my few achievements and future prospects, and it's easy to get bogged down with the "why?" of it all. I try to enjoy the hobby for what it is, and embrace the fact that I dig the toys as much as (and on some days, perhaps more than) the music itself... but I don't always feel at ease with it. Even truly accepting that this has all amounted to a "mere hobby" was an adjustment. Ego's a bitch. It was certainly easier to hold on to the flame when I was young(ish) and anything seemed possible, however improbable.

I'm not even sure whether this relates to the OP, but there it is. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 
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For me, it's mostly about my mental state, and second about my physical abilities. And hopefully it'll never be about my brain's ability to process the cognitive part.

Mental: I lost all joy for playing guitar for about 5 years, about 5 years ago. But it came back, and I really don't know what triggered it. But once it did, I invested in some better gear, and for the most part, that has kept the fire lit for me. And I don't even play with others. Just practicing at home and seeing growth is enough for me. And I'm better now, at 59, than I've ever been!

Physical: I developed a cyst on my fretting wrist a few months ago that gives me some infrequent pain, but I'm taking steps to get that removed. Other than that, I do wish I could break through my current speed limit when it comes to playing certain solos. And I'm not talking about sick-ass John Petrucci stuff either. I still struggle with basic rock standards because my left hand fingers are just so freaking slow.

Cognitive: I truly hope this isn't foreshadowing things to come, but I sometimes blank in the middle of playing. Like, just have a brain fart and forget what comes next. It only lasts for a split second, but it's enough to make me screw up a solo. Or even a simple song. This never used to happen. A bit concerning, but one of the reasons I practice challenging material is to help keep my brain sharp, like others do crossword puzzles. Here's to hoping it works!

I have pondered the fact that any one of those 3 could make me call it quits, but so far it hasn't happened.
 
I still long for a original metal thing but I fear original days are behind me and that kind of makes me sad. I have a lot fun doing what we do though so I will take it as overall a good thing.

That guitarist last night was asking me why I’m not pursuing an original metal band and my eyes about glazed over. I long for it but that’s just the idea of the original metal band, not the actual work of starting one and finding like minded people. That in itself is such a daunting task I have zero interest.
 
That guitarist last night was asking me why I’m not pursuing an original metal band and my eyes about glazed over. I long for it but that’s just the idea of the original metal band, not the actual work of starting one and finding like minded people. That in itself is such a daunting task I have zero interest.
Getting people who want to do it for fun, getting people who can do it, writing stuff as a group that everyone likes, booking a gig at a venue that wants you to pad your set from 30 minutes to 3 hours.....JFC:brick:poop:
 
For me, it's mostly about my mental state, and second about my physical abilities. And hopefully it'll never be about my brain's ability to process the cognitive part.

Mental: I lost all joy for playing guitar for about 5 years, about 5 years ago. But it came back, and I really don't know what triggered it. But once it did, I invested in some better gear, and for the most part, that has kept the fire lit for me. And I don't even play with others. Just practicing at home and seeing growth is enough for me. And I'm better now, at 59, than I've ever been!

Physical: I developed a cyst on my fretting wrist a few months ago that gives me some infrequent pain, but I'm taking steps to get that removed. Other than that, I do wish I could break through my current speed limit when it comes to playing certain solos. And I'm not talking about sick-ass John Petrucci stuff either. I still struggle with basic rock standards because my left hand fingers are just so freaking slow.

Cognitive: I truly hope this isn't foreshadowing things to come, but I sometimes blank in the middle of playing. Like, just have a brain fart and forget what comes next. It only lasts for a split second, but it's enough to make me screw up a solo. Or even a simple song. This never used to happen. A bit concerning, but one of the reasons I practice challenging material is to help keep my brain sharp, like others do crossword puzzles. Here's to hoping it works!

I have pondered the fact that any one of those 3 could make me call it quits, but so far it hasn't happened.
This aspect is frustrating: being aware that your physical body is beginning to present limitations (in my case, arthritis, tendonitis) even as your phrasing, etc. continue to improve.
 
I keep the Randy Rhoads, classical guitar study path in my back pocket, as an option for later in life, too.

But a huge part of what I enjoy about music is playing it with other people, so I don't know if that will ever happen.

That being said, I could also go the studio rat route, as there was a time in my teens where I hardly came out of my room and wrote/recorded 24/7 with a four-track recorder. But it's been a long time and I'd have a lot of learning and catching up to do, but that's part of the fun, too.
 
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