Credible YouTubers for Recording, Mix and Mastering

fretworn

Rock Star
TGF Recording Artist
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This guy can get slightly technical and deep, but I dig that sh*t.

I’ve watched a lot, and this guy seems sharp.



Panorama Mix and Mastering
 
I dig Produce Like A Pro quite a bit as well. Dude’s worked with some giants in the industry and while he puts out a lot of repetitive content, it’s good stuff.

I used to love Pensado’s Place as well, they had some really great interviews. Something from that I’d suggest isn’t a particular artist, but be willing to listen to a producer of genres you don’t normally dig, there’s a ton of insight in there that crosses paths with other genres. Low end is something almost every home-studio guy has an issue with, so it’s not a bad idea to listen to some hip hop producers and how they go about dialing it in or how they approach a mix in general with low end focus.

Man, I’d LOVE to get some producers on here for AMAs.
 
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Glen Fricker
 
Glenn Fricker's actual recording advice tends to be extremely solid, whether or not you agree with him about religious topics like tonewood or whatever
 
Glenn Fricker's actual recording advice tends to be extremely solid, whether or not you agree with him about religious topics like tonewood or whatever
like abusing the musicians paying him, having rigid opinions on drum samples/editing/tuning?

I also don’t agree with him trashing gear and shilling other bits rather than just understanding stuff better. The way he talks in absolutes is also misleading (e.g THIS SUCKS, THIS RULES).
 
The jingle studios have those types. It’s like night and day from a studio that caters to bands. Some of them even had the lab coats!
 
The jingle studios have those types. It’s like night and day from a studio that caters to bands. Some of them even had the lab coats!


What are you talking about?

I’m talking about being a professional; working via professional principles ie:

  • Know your shit
  • Have and employ integrity
  • Be on time
  • Make sure you’re prepared
  • Gear is up to pro standards
  • Fix issues without bitching; be creative and have thick skin
  • Manage time and resources well; have a plan
  • Make good decisions (which you can explain and execute)
This is how I work, and thus my expectations of others working with me.

If doing none of that equals being “band centric” … I don’t want any part of being “band-centric”
 
I was responding to the term "demeanor". What you described in the follow up is pretty much any good studio, and pretty much what Glenn Fricker does as well. But Mirror profiles brings up some good points!
 
I should add not all Glenn’s stuff is bad by any stretch - there’s plenty of good stuff there. But I’m sort of concerned by beginners picking up things from him and thinking it’s a normal or professional way to work. With most people I think you have to take what they say with a pinch of salt, but his shouty OTT demeanour means I think it’s worth being more careful with him. It’s a kind of act that isn’t really acceptable in a professional setting
 
Glenn Fricker's actual recording advice tends to be extremely solid, whether or not you agree with him about religious topics like tonewood or whatever
I particularly liked his months and years long opinion on using canned drums. Well, that was until he started selling canned drums and his opinion went 180 degrees.
I’m sure pickups will matter again as soon as there’s an SMG branded pickup, too.
 
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