My technique. Or lack thereof. Probably won't change anytime soon and I am OK with that.

JiveTurkey

Goatlord
TGF Recording Artist
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Seriously.

What I do on the guitar is just odd. Metal riffing right hand. Ham fisted stiff lead playing that has been drained of any sort of vibe because god forbid I hit a bum note that has the GK pickup misfiring the wrong accordion note through the PA. Dumb guitar synth noises.

I don't think I'll ever care to work hard enough be able to change it so I just do what I do and embrace things, warts and all. Anyone else make peace with their limitations?
 
Yeah, more or less.

I only want to put effort towards things that serve finding and nurturing my voice.
I’ve wasted many a years on fretboard workouts already.

Theory, harmony etc. is something I learn and inculcate into my playing.

If I had to play death metal for 3 hrs straight, I’d have to improve technique and endurance.
But for the 30 min high gain fun, I’m well equipped, thankfully.
 
I was told by a guitar teacher 35+ years ago that I would make a good bassist

:oops: :(:rofl

The shoe fits, generally speaking. I've gotten competent enough to play in original bands and do cover work with some great people. I feel like if I am in a spot, skill level-wise where if I can do these things; I am good. Insert Stuart Smalley gif here :bag
 
Yes. Limitations are the space without which creativity cannot flourish. For me they are the borders
and frame that helps define our sonic canvas.

I only want enough skill and technique to get what's inside my head/heart out. Beyond that
none of it is necessary.
 
Yeah, I don't think my overall technique is going to change/improve much, but my hope is that my general musicality still gets better. Things like improvising, phrasing, writing, playing with other musicians, groove, dynamics, depth of expression, etc.
 
I started playing guitar WAY late compared to most of you, and still have a ways to go, so I’m not stuck in status quo technique-wise. I guess that’s a good thing. But many times it’s frustrating that I’m not further along. Mostly that applies to lead playing. I can hold my own with most rhythms for the genres that I play.
 
I didn't have a time early in my playing history when I focused on just my playing abilities, so I could develop into whatever 'level' of a player I had the potential to be. I was too busy partying. So I slopped my way through most of the music I used to do, and a few years ago decided I don't want to play like that any more. I wanna at least see what I'm capable of, even if the progress is slower than if I had done this when I was much younger.
So I'm kinda going back and filling in some gaps. I suppose I haven't made peace with it yet, because I never really applied myself.
 
Yup - almost 20 years ago I started focusing on things that sounded good when I play them vs the huge world of the unattainable.

It totally changed my enjoyment of playing. And I made way more progress as a result.
 
I do not gig anymore, so I am more focused on finding the tones that I enjoy and the playing experience rather than my shitty technique.

Ironically, 35 years ago I had some students. Yes. I had no idea. No method. No teacher. No discipline. We didn't even had YouTube to lean some tips. I did self-learn by ear and formed a band where we played our songs and covers. But for some reason hard to understand, other kids loved it and they paid me to teach them the shit that I played
 
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Yeah, I don't think my overall technique is going to change/improve much, but my hope is that my general musicality still gets better. Things like improvising, phrasing, writing, playing with other musicians, groove, dynamics, depth of expression, etc.

I feel pretty much the same.

Also, every time I realise that I'm not getting much better, I just add another pedal (obviously).
 
Anyone else make peace with their limitations?
Yes… kinda wanted to try and tuned my guitar to drop C# and retuned from there to “Open D”…. Ehh.. I guess that becomes Open D half step down? Idk really :ROFLMAO: … just for fun… 2 years ago… was just planning to try it then return to E standard to resume actual guitar theory practice but that was two years ago and I’m to lazy…

But I’m still finding ways and voicings that are interesting… on my own.
But trying to play a known song is out of the question…

I need another guitar damn it…
 
Yeah, I don't think my overall technique is going to change/improve much, but my hope is that my general musicality still gets better. Things like improvising, phrasing, writing, playing with other musicians, groove, dynamics, depth of expression, etc.
This Up Here GIF by Chord Overstreet


I’ll never be able to play like Joe Satriani however, I love his ability to pick the exact right note at the exact right time. Learned a really simple tune of his yesterday; “10 words“… “learned” might be a bit of a stretch 😝
 
I was fortunate that my uncle filled my ears with guys like EJ, Vai, Petrucci and The Hellecasters right out of the gate. He'd tell me "You better be able to kick my ass in 20 years, I'm starting you off with the big guys!" (He can wipe the floor with me any day and always will)

I had a good 4-5 years where I was woodshedding and obsessed with playing, the chromatic 16th's to a metronome, the Vai 10-hour workouts, whatever I could find in guitar mags. Then I discovered Pantera, booze, weed and chicks. While guitar never take a backseat, I wasn't nearly as focused on technique after. I think it's fair to say that 85% of what I can do now is from those first 4-5 years and the final 15% is just from practicing as-needed. That was around the same time I was falling in love with drums, which definitely helped guitar take a backseat.

About 5 years ago I was writing some music that I simply couldn't play well enough to record, I got stressed about it for a few hours and then thought "Well, Cantrell writes badass songs that doesn't require any of that sh*t, so I'm just going to focus on what I CAN do and drive that home." and I've been fairly content ever since.
 
I got 99 problems (at least) but my technique ain't one.

Which isn't to say that my technique is any great shakes (not by modern standards, certainly.) But those 99+ other problems? Yeesh. It's all relative, I guess.

:bag
 
Still saddled with the makings of a great bassist :ROFLMAO:
I'd say that teacher paid you quite a compliment. Every time I make anything resembling a step forward on the guitar, it's because I remembered to pay attention to a bassline for a few minutes. (And I still can't play the bass...)
 
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